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About Amida

Amida is the mom to three darn kids. She used to stress about state standards and test scores but has since come to her senses and enjoys blogging about her family's journey into unschooling.

Eating better as a family in two easy steps

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Written by Amida of Journey Into Unschooling.

A few years ago, I had the most horrible rash known to mankind. It started as a small, itchy patch that I took for bug bites. But then it grew bigger and other patches started popping up until my whole body was covered with it.

I went to the doctor, who quizzed me and determined that I was allergic to the new dog living in my home.

I went to the allergist, who examined me under a microscope, and declared I had scabies.

I went to the dermatologist, who took one look at my arms, and he said it was obviously eczema. While they all prescribed me ointments (I declined the scabies treatment) that offered relief of my symptoms, not one of them offered any long term solutions to the problem. I was still breaking out and scratching myself bloody. Something had to be done.

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5 things kids really want to know about homeschooling

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The following is a post by contributor Amida of journey into unschooling.

So, how do you homeschool? This by far, is perhaps the most asked question regarding our schooling.

One day, upon learning that my children are homeschooled,  a group of elementary school kids instantly bombarded them with questions concerning their education: What do you have to do? How long does it take to finish? Do you get recess? What do you eat at your homeschool? Who is your teacher?

I found it all very amusing, especially my son’s brief responses — everything, until we are done, yes, anything, Mom. I thought I’d take this moment to elaborate for him.

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Conquering clutter for homeschoolers

 amidapicmo

Written by Amida of Journey into Unschooling.

Chinese New Year is just around the corner and for me, it means a massive purge session. Something about the upcoming New Year always brings on the urge for me to clean, clean, clean.

Out with the old and in with the — well, hopefully, nothing!

This time around, I am determined to keep the Stuff at bay and out of my house.

Just seeing the amount of things that have snuck in and filled up all corners of my home is enough to make me think twice about my spending and acquiring habits (because in actuality, a lot of things enter in the form of gifts, freebies, and deals-too-good-to-pass-up).

Want to join me in cleaning out the clutter?

If so, grab your gloves and 30-gallon heavy duty bags and favorite playlist. It’s time to purge!

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Amida’s homeschool day in life (with a 4-, 8-, 13-, and 16-year-old)

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Written by Amida from Journey into Unschooling.

Another year, another day in the life! I can’t believe I’ve been writing these for the past four years!

Choosing a day to represent your homeschool is no easy feat, but this time around, I thought I’d share how a typical day went when I was uninspired and just winging it (and I’m sure we all have our moments).

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The day started off very slowly. I knew I wanted my 8-year-old to get some work done, but was just very unmotivated to get started.

Then I spotted some left over origami paper from the bookmark projects we had worked on a few days ago (nothing ever gets put away around here) and got totally distracted and started making dolls.

Hey, they were pretty fun! I shared my procrastination funk with my friends online and they were very motivating. “That’s art! And culture! And math!” they said.

Sure, except I was the one doing all the work, and well, I kind of graduated 3rd grade years ago.
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And then they hated math: My journey into unschooling

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Written by contributor Amida of Journey Into Unschooling

remember the first time I called myself an unschooler. I had just read John Holt’s Teach Your Own and was impressed with his vision of an alternative educational style in which children were encouraged to learn outside of school.

He saw children as scientists, eager and capable of exploring and experimenting with the world around them. Yes, I thought, that is exactly what I wanted my children to experience.

I had visions of them spending their days wandering through nature, collecting and identifying leaves, filling notepads with their amazingly original stories, learning math, engineering, civics, and science through a year-long project of designing and building a cardboard, solar-powered city.

It was learning at its fantastical best — fun, natural, and meaningful.
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