Learning through community service

flowerWritten by contributor Amida of Journey Into Unschooling

About five years ago, I signed my family up for a community service event. It was one of those random, spur of the moment deals. I saw a posting somewhere to participate on some restoration work at a local park and decided to give it a shot. With a two-year-old on my back and seven- and ten-year-old in tow, we set off.

I am a total introvert and don’t exactly shine in the meet-and-greet department, so I was cautious and nervous, to say the least. Worse, they started off by making a big circle and doing “fun” introductions — you know, give your name and dance move, that kind of thing.

Luckily, I survived and we spent an awesome day learning about the native plants and visiting a tide pool afterwards. And as it often happens in our close knit homeschool community, someone knew me through a mutual friend, and we got to meet and became great friends. Small world, right?

It is in this small world, though, that I have discovered a whole new lifestyle.

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10 homeschooling stereotypes (& their rebuttals)

classroomWritten by contributor Amida of Journey into Unschooling

So you’re thinking about homeschooling. Here are a few basic items you need to get started:

  • A designated school room, where you gather to teach the kids their lessons every day.
  • A schedule, obviously, so you know which topics to cover every day.
  • A curriculum, so you know what to teach them every day.
  • A degree, preferably in education, so you are qualified to teach them every day.

Got everything? Good. Let’s get started…

This seems to be the general idea of what goes on in our house daily. I probably thought the same when I first researched homeschooling, and while it may hold true for some, this type of environment and structure doesn’t work for us.

Since I get asked a lot about our personal experience, mostly on the hows and whys, I thought I’d share some of the most common homeschooling stereotypes I’ve come across along with my rebuttals.
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TV will rot your brains

he-man

Written by contributor Amida of Journey into Unschooling

I grew up on a lot of TV. The first show I remember ever watching was a cartoon called Xiao Tian Tian. I had lived with a lot of other kids and every dinner, we’d all grab our bowls of rice, leave our families, and gather around the tiny screen to watch. I don’t recall a single dish I ate, but can still hear the theme song in my head…

We got our first TV set when I was around five. It had turn dials, rabbit ears, and no remote control. The first show that came on was Wile E. Coyote trying to catch his Road Runner.
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Amida’s homeschool day in the life (with a 2-, 6-, 11-, and 14-year-old)

Contributor Amida writes for Journey into Unschooling

Homeschoolers as a whole, I think, are quite fascinated about other homeschoolers, specifically their schedules. I know I am. “What are you doing for school?” is one of the most frequently asked questions among my friends.

The answer, of course, depends on many factors — time of the year, grade level, and energy level. For the most part, we work around a cycle of accumulating school work and not really doing school.

Our schedule is very loose and mostly made up as we go. The only constants are the extracurricular or otherwise outside classes, so almost everything else gets scheduled around them. As such, our days will differ depending on the day of the week.

Usually, my kids work best without distraction, so when there is an afternoon class, we try to squeeze in some schoolwork before then, when their minds are focused and alert.

For the most part, we have three typical schedules, depending on the time of the outside classes. On a busy day, we do something like this:
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So, how do you homeschool?

Written by contributor Amida of Journey into Unschooling.

“You cannot teach a man anything; you can only help him find it within himself.”

~Galileo Galilei

When people first find out that I homeschool my children, their first response is inevitably, “Wow — That’s great!” followed closely by, “How do you do it?”

They wonder if there is a set schedule with a set curriculum. To them, “homeschool” translates to “school at home”. They comment on how hard it must be to keep four kids under control or even hint at my brilliance for being able to “teach” them everything they need to know.

Usually, I just shrug it off and say it’s not really anything extraordinary. It’s all we know and very much just a part of our lives. If anything,  I find the act of getting kids to and from school and extracurricular activities, in addition to making sure they complete all their homework everyday to be an amazing feat all its own.
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