Cait’s homeschool day in the life (with a 5-, 7-, and 8-year-old)

Written by Cait Curley or My Little Poppies.

I had grand plans to write about a typical homeschool day in our life. I was going to pick a random Monday or Friday and share our day from start to finish.

But my husband was working last weekend and I decided to take the kids up north for a few days. (One of the biggest benefits of homeschooling is the ability to get out of Dodge whenever the spirit moves you.)

Well, our getaway was extended by a snowstorm.

Then, we returned home to not one, but two nor’easters.

And that is how I ended up writing about writing about what Valentine’s Day looked like in our homeschool.

A homeschool day in the life

Valentine’s Day is not what I had planned. It is certainly not typical.

But, after writing this post, I realized that our day followed a normal rhythm (with sugar added).

The reality is: when it comes to homeschooling, there is no typical. And that’s a wonderful thing.

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How to add more play to your homeschool (and not feel guilty)


Written by Caitlin Curley of My Little Poppies

From history to language arts, math to music, and everything in between, don’t miss Cait’s full list of games for every subject!

week before Christmas, my husband turned to me and asked, “So… have they been doing any math?”*

I felt myself bristle at his words. I sat up straighter, jaw set, defensive. “Of course we’ve done math!” I sputtered.

We had done math, just not much traditional math because it was the holidays.

My mind raced:

  • We had read piles of math storybooks
  • The kids had followed a recipe for bird cookies independently, tripling the recipe so they would each have plenty
  • There had been lots of baking
  • The children had done some holiday shopping
  • We had watched a favorite DVD
  • And, of course, we had played countless board games

How to Play More in Your Homeschool (And Not Feel Guilty) How to Add More Play to Your Homeschool (And Not Feel Guilty)

But there was nothing tangible, no proof.

And that happens a lot with homeschooling.

Despite the intangible nature of our pre-Christmas mathematics, I was prepared to defend my case. After all, I know how well my children learn when I combine fantastic read alouds, experiential learning, and educational games.

I need not have worried; he believed me. There were no further questions. The doubt had passed.

* Now this is where I need to pause and tell you that my husband is my biggest homeschool supporter and cheerleader, but even the most amazing homeschool dads fall victim to occasional doubt and second-guessing… especially during holiday chaos!

The truth is, I used to doubt this approach to learning. 

  • Is it okay to set curriculum aside and pick up a book?
  • Can games be considered curriculum?
  • Does this really count as homeschooling?

Thankfully, this doubt has passed, too. I’ve been homeschooling long enough to know when we are doing something well.

I even have a name for it: gameschooling.

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Haunted by the Ghost of Public School Past?

ghostpublicschool
Written by Caitlin Curley of My Little Poppies

One of the most challenging parts of homeschooling, at least for me, is remembering to keep school and education separate.

I know this, but I also spent many years in school both as a student and an educator.

It can be tough to shake that public school mindset.

When we first started homeschooling, we attempted to recreate a school at home. That didn’t last long.

When things are going well, when I’m trusting my gut and my children, our homeschooling looks nothing like school.

It is only when the doubt creeps in that we struggle and start to second-guess… well… everything.

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How brain dumps can help little worriers

how brain dumps can help little worriers

Written by Caitlin Fitzpatrick Curely of My Little Poppies

My oldest son is a compassionate, funny, creative, wonderful little human.

He’s also a World Class Worrier.

At 8-years-old, he should be spending his summer running through sprinklers and climbing trees and eating his weight in watermelon. He should be making mud pies and catching fireflies and having cannonball contests.

And he is doing all of those things, but he’s also worrying.

Worry is tricky like that. It can pop up, out of nowhere, on a beautiful day.

Worry can derail a summer.

No one is immune to worry. It is a natural part of the human experience, a crucial part of the fight-or-flight response. Worry protects us.

But it certainly doesn’t feel that way for some of us. Some of us worry more.

I am one of those people. I can remember being his age and laying awake on a hot summer night, scared out of my mind, unable to fall asleep.

So is it any wonder that now, thirty years later, I have a child who does the same? That apple does not fall far.

I wish I could make his worries magically disappear. I wish I could erase them from his mind so that he can get back to being eight and awesome.

BRAIN DUMP

Unfortunately, worry doesn’t work that way. You cannot snap your fingers and make it go away, but you can learn to manage it.

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On the quest for homeschool mindfulness

On the quest for homeschool mindfulness
Written by Caitlin Curley of My Little Poppies

So there is this thing that happens when you homeschool, but it doesn’t happen right away.

At least, it didn’t for me.

You see, I’m one of the unexpected homeschoolers. I landed here swiftly and without warning and it took a good long while for me to adjust to our new normal.

But, eventually, it starts to happen.

At first, it’s subtle.

homeschool mindfulness d

Maybe you ease up on your planning or your record keeping.

Maybe you stop relentlessly crossing off all those to-dos in your mind.

Maybe you even lighten up on yourself and concede that you’re doing a pretty good job at this homeschooling thing, most of the time.

After a little while, during a moment of clarity, you see that you have relaxed into homeschooling. You have, for the most part, shaken off the public school mindset. You’ve learned firsthand that school and learning are two entirely different things and one can exist without the other.

You’ve realized that learning happens all the time when you relax and let it.

And, boy, does that feel good. Because it gives you permission to take everything down a notch or two and just breathe.

homeschool mindfulness 5

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