Seniors: 4 tips for letting go

Letting kids go

The following is a post by Cheryl Pitt of CherylPitt.com.

It’s that time of year — graduation!

Our children have reached the age of legal independence.  Some of them may be heading off to college, perhaps even far away. It’s time to let our children go, literally, not just figuratively anymore.

For the first time ever, I’m navigating these difficult waters. Who knew it would be so hard to let go?

My firstborn is a senior. He’ll be graduating in a few short months.

While he’s not planning on moving away right now, he is taking hold of his newfound independence with a firm grip. I couldn’t be more proud of him, yet it still breaks my heart.

To help myself through this emotional time, I’ve chatted with a few older, wiser women in my life. They were all full of wonderful advice.

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Dealing with homeschool doubt

sheilamain

The following is a guest post written by Sheila Petruccelli of Sure as the World.

Usually it sneaks up on me.

It starts as an infrequent whisper and quickly progresses to an insistent echo in my head. It undercuts my plans and has me second-guessing just about everything. It casts a shadow over the good days and magnifies the bad ones.

It follows me from morning to night and even haunts my dreams.

It’s doubt: a nebulous and invasive feeling of uncertainty that makes me feel as though I’m standing in quicksand.

It happens about once every homeschooling year, and it absolutely slays me.
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Homeschool & live happily ever after (or not)

Homeschool and live happily ever after (or not) ~SimpleHomeschool
Jamie Martin, editor of Simple Homeschool, also blogs about motherhood at Steady Mom

“My crown is called content, a crown that seldom kings enjoy.”
~William Shakespeare

I cried. At least once a day. For years.

No, I wasn’t suffering from depression. Nor did I have a chronic eye watering condition.

I was homeschooling.

Five years ago, Steve and I made the “official” decision to homeschool. It was scary, of course–a move into a completely unknown world.

But our hearts, souls, minds and spirits pointed in this direction so we stepped out.

The educational philosophy that resonated with us most, Leadership Education, advocated delayed academics in the early years–letting children learn through play and allowing their own internal motivation to direct their education. We would “inspire, not require” instead of following a rigid program.

“Our kids are so lucky,” I thought more than once. (And still do.)

Not having to spend our days entrenched in an impersonal institution, we would all be so happy with our growing freedoms together.

Except we weren’t.
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5 things kids really want to know about homeschooling

amidamain

The following is a post by contributor Amida of journey into unschooling.

So, how do you homeschool? This by far, is perhaps the most asked question regarding our schooling.

One day, upon learning that my children are homeschooled,  a group of elementary school kids instantly bombarded them with questions concerning their education: What do you have to do? How long does it take to finish? Do you get recess? What do you eat at your homeschool? Who is your teacher?

I found it all very amusing, especially my son’s brief responses — everything, until we are done, yes, anything, Mom. I thought I’d take this moment to elaborate for him.

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When everyone is falling apart …

lisakremer4picmonkThe following is a guest post written by Lisa Kremer of Life is a Journey.

I can’t think of many things in life more stressful than selling your house and moving.

Add to that six busy homeschooled kids.

Add to that the fact that this is our second move in one year. (Military families, I salute you …)

The boxes were piled up and the toys had been sifted through numerous times, me continually asking the kids (and myself): “Do we really need to hang onto that?”
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