Read your way to a love of math: 50 titles for ages 4-12

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Read your way to a love of mathWritten by Jamie Martin of Simple Homeschool and Steady Mom

Past posts in this math series:
* A different way to look at math
* Out of the box math inspiration

For the past few weeks we’ve explored math study from a different perspective, asking two important questions: Why do we do what we do when it comes to this subject? Are there other valid approaches to consider?

A different way to look at math

An alternative to workbook pages in the early years is the simple sharing of a book spread open across your lap. It’s one of the easiest ways to create a blossoming love of numbers and patterns in a child’s heart and mind.

I started to put together a massive list of books for you to choose from in today’s post, but then I stopped to consider what I would have found most helpful when I was getting started as a slightly-insecure homeschooling mama.

I realized that I would have loved to have a handful of well-chosen math titles, recommended by a blogger I trusted.

I’ve tried to provide that for you here, highlighting the resources we’ve found most enjoyable in our own family – as well as including a list of other popular books you may want to check out.

Enjoy the journey as you read your way to a love of math!

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And then they hated math: My journey into unschooling

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Written by contributor Amida of Journey Into Unschooling

remember the first time I called myself an unschooler. I had just read John Holt’s Teach Your Own and was impressed with his vision of an alternative educational style in which children were encouraged to learn outside of school.

He saw children as scientists, eager and capable of exploring and experimenting with the world around them. Yes, I thought, that is exactly what I wanted my children to experience.

I had visions of them spending their days wandering through nature, collecting and identifying leaves, filling notepads with their amazingly original stories, learning math, engineering, civics, and science through a year-long project of designing and building a cardboard, solar-powered city.

It was learning at its fantastical best — fun, natural, and meaningful.
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The lazy girl’s guide to home education

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Written by contributor Kari Patterson of Sacred Mundane

A big forest behind our house, lots of free time to read, a garden, science fairs, a playhouse, maps on the wall, Legos, an old piano, sketch books, almost no TV, and a library card.

These were the key components of my homeschool education growing up. In fact, when I’m asked what my homeschool days were like I usually respond, “I remember home but I don’t remember any school.”

My mom loves that.
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3 kids, 3 journeys to reading

3 kids, 3 journeys to reading
Jamie Martin, editor of Simple Homeschool, also blogs about motherhood at Steady Mom

Learning to read. It’s a big deal, isn’t it?

I know it often feels HUGE to us as homeschooling parents. It’s kind of the first thing we don’t want to mess up, ya know? But in our eagerness to prove ourselves, we sometimes end up rushing these little people we love more than anything.

I thought it might be helpful if I shared the way my three children learned (& are learning) to read. It amazes me that with three kids, the process has been different every time.

That’s why a cookie cutter approach to education just won’t work. We need to treat our kids like individuals–because they are!

Here’s what the road to the written word has looked like in our home.
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Teaching kids to bake: The results

teaching baking to kids- the results
Jamie Martin, editor of Simple Homeschool, also blogs about motherhood at Steady Mom

Last autumn I shared in detail about how and why I started formal baking lessons as part of our homeschool.

If you missed the post, here’s a brief recap: Each child over the age of eight in our family receives an “invitation” to study with me and learn how to bake. If they choose to enroll in the class, I present them with a binder and a syllabus of ten recipes we’ll learn to make together.

When the student can make all ten items independently, they “graduate.” Their graduation celebration (and final exam, I guess) is to host a party for friends where they bake all the goodies themselves.
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