About Shawna Wingert

Shawna Wingert is the creator of Not The Former Things, a blog dedicated to homeschooling children with learning differences and special needs. She loves finding out-of-the-box ways for out-of-the-box learners to thrive. She is the author of two books, Special Education at Home and Everyday Autism. You can follow Shawna and Not The Former Things on Pinterest, Facebook and Instagram.

Shawna’s homeschool day in the life (with a 12- and 15-year-old)

Written by Shawna Wingert of Not the Former Things

Every year, before sitting down to write this annual post, I go back and read my previous days in the life.

It’s a tremendous blessing to have such a wonderful record of my boys’ different ages and all the various homeschooling approaches we have used.

This year, I did the same.

Honestly, it made me really sad.

This day in the life is not recording one of our best, or even one of our average days. This day in the life is in the midst of a very difficult season for my youngest son – physically, emotionally and educationally.

I am recording it however, the same as I have our previous three years, with transparency and a whole lot of grace, for myself and for my boys.

[Read more…]

Why I don’t add anything new to our homeschool in January

Written by Shawna Wingert of Not the Former Things

I love the idea of a new year.

A fresh start. A list of ways to get back on track after the busy holiday season. A new planner.

All of it makes my type-A self a little giddy.

In the past, I have applied the same ‘New Year, New You’ approach to our homeschool.

I mean, what better time to add something new, change up our schedule, and refocus all the priorities I have for my boys’ education?
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Homeschooling like it’s my job

Written by Shawna Wingert of Not the Former Things.

The past few months have been a little rocky around here.

Because, you know, life.

This has been doubly true for our homeschool.  Two months after starting our new school year, we still are trying to get into some semblance of a routine.

These difficulties have challenged me to not only look at what I am expecting of my boys, but what I am expecting of myself.

Over the past few weeks, I have been trying something that has completely changed my perspective on helping my kiddos learn.

I am homeschooling like it’s my job.

[Read more…]

In celebration of the slow learner

Written by Shawna Wingert of Not the Former Things

I remember exactly when I first heard the term “slow learner.”

I was in the third grade, and my desk was next to a sweet boy with freckles and blue eyes.

In class, I diligently filled out all the worksheets, and raised my hand to answer all the questions (my husband and I went to school together and he distinctly remembers me being “very Hermione”).

I was careful to listen to the teacher, to write my name in the upper right-hand corner, and painstakingly bubble in A, B, C or D, with my Number 2 pencil.

The little boy next to me could not have been more my opposite. He struggled in the classroom. I often read things to him under my breath when he was unable to decode them. He seemed to have a motor inside him that kept parts of his body moving at all times. One time, he drew me a perfect, frame-able picture of a cat, instead of writing a summary of the story we had just read aloud (which incidentally, was about a cat.)

A teacher’s aide often came to assist him. When another student asked why she was always at our table, she answered, very plainly, “Because he is a slow learner.”

When she said this, the boy blushed so red I could barely make out his freckles. I looked away, not wanting to make it more embarrassing for him.

My stomach ached every time that aide came in for the rest of the year.

I was eight years old and it was clear – being a ‘slow learner’ was a shameful thing.

[Read more…]

How to measure progress when it feels like you’re not making any

Written by Shawna Wingert of Not the Former Things

We began this school year in almost the exact same place we did last year.

(and I don’t mean our kitchen table…)

My youngest son is one of the hardest working kids I have ever met. He has had to be – most of the time, he works twice as hard for twice as long to get about half the results of other children.

So it really shouldn’t surprise me that we are still in Level Two of our reading curriculum. Even more so, it shouldn’t matter. On my good days, it doesn’t.

But some days, the truth is, it feels like we are not making any progress at all.

When I worked outside the home, I loved feeling like I had achieved something. Measurement was an important motivator for me. It still is.

While my job has changed substantially, my desire to see results and have the satisfaction of making progress has not.

Over the past seven years, I have learned that sometimes, if I want to see progress in our homeschool, I am going to have to go looking for it on my own.

[Read more…]

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