10 ways you’re making your homeschool day harder than it needs to be

10 ways you're making your homeschool day harder
Jamie Martin, editor of Simple Homeschool, also blogs about motherhood at Steady Mom

I woke with dreary eyes. The thought of the day ahead seemed pretty bleak.

At breakfast time I pulled out our latest read-aloud (an activity I usually love), thinking I’d rather go to the dentist than proceed.

But I plodded ahead through gritted teeth–I have a job to do after all, my inner drill sergeant announced–the result not at all inspiring for any of us.

We would have been better off that morning with a Sparkle Story to listen to over breakfast, a cup of warm tea for the mama, and a few extra minutes to regroup and plan peace for the day ahead.

Ever have a day like this?

Homeschooling can be hard enough, but I sometimes find I make it even harder on myself by falling into negative patterns or mindsets.

Here are a few ways you may be doing the same.
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Homeschooling as an introvert: the blessings & challenges

homeschooling as an introvert-the blessings & challengesJamie Martin, editor of Simple Homeschool, also blogs about motherhood at Steady Mom

“I could never do that” seems to be one of the most common responses when it comes up in conversation that I homeschool my children. What does that actually mean?

I think when people say “I could never do that” they sometimes mean they don’t have the personality that fits a homeschooling lifestyle. So consider today’s post the start of a new series on this blog: personalities in the homeschool.

personalities at home

I’m not sure there is such a thing as an ideal homeschool personality. We all have our tendencies and our quirks–as any personality test will point out. (I’m an INFJ if you’re curious!)

Certainly knowing ourselves better helps us steer our homeschooling style to capitalize on our strengths and minimize our weaknesses. Since I’m most familiar with the introverted parent’s perspective–let’s start today with some thoughts about homeschooling as an introvert.
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Creating a lifestyle of learning

Wilkins_Melissa2picmo

The following is a guest post written by Melissa Camara Wilkins of melissacamarawilkins.com.

When our first daughter was born, we knew we were not going to homeschool.

We knew some homeschooled kids. Those kids were weird.

Two things that didn’t occur to us back then:

1. There are a lot of homeschooled kids out there. We knew two who were weird. That might not have been a representative sample.

2. We are also weird. It’s not such a bad thing.

It didn’t take us long to realize that choosing an educational philosophy based on trying to avoid making weird kids was not actually the best plan.

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How to foster independence in your homeschool student

krismainpicmo

The following post is written by contributing writer Kris Bales of Weird, Unsocialized Homeschoolers.

I‘ll go out on a limb here and say that the majority of parents who’ve homeschooled more than a year or two start thinking about creating independent learners.

Once our kids have mastered the basics of reading, writing, and arithmetic, we’re ready to start preparing them for learning on their own.

It’s not, I don’t think, that we are eager to get away from our kids. It’s just that, by that point, we’ve spent a lot of time pouring in to them and we’re ready for them to start working on their own a bit.

You know, long enough for us to do a load of laundry, put away the dirty dishes, or make a quick phone call.

Or go to the bathroom alone.

I don’t really expect a lot of independence from my kids until they’re about middle school age, but there are little things that we can start doing to prepare them before then. [Read more...]

Emphasizing beauty in your homeschool

hannahmainThe following is a guest post written by Hannah Vanderpool of Praying with One Eye Open.

Let’s face it: Life is hard regardless of where one lives, and humans have a tendency to focus on what is wrong in the world.

When my family and I moved to a rural area in north India, we expected to encounter tough times. We knew that there would be poverty and sorrows along with deep friendships and joy. We homeschooled our three kids in India, and there were times when the needs of our national friends overwhelmed us as we lived out our lives alongside them.

I knew that if we weren’t careful, we might be tempted to approach the world mostly as a place of sorrow and futility. This was not what I wanted to teach my children.

Before long I began looking for ways to brighten our tiny apartment (rusty pipes and rat-friends notwithstanding) because I began to understand that a powerful way to encourage my young ones — and myself — was to concentrate on the beautiful.

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