Making friends through homeschooling (without worrying about socialization)


The following is a guest post by Kara Anderson of Quill and Camera.

We were at a follow-up check for my daughter, who had surprised our ancient cat–and paid for it.

Her hand had become infected from a deep scratch, and for some reason, I was convinced this was a sign of terrible parenting. And so, I was already on edge when the doctor asked my 5-year-old how she liked school.

“Ummm, I homeschool,” she said looking to me for reassurance.

She is still not accustomed to people asking this. But I have an older son, and so I am used to it. I also know the inevitable follow-up.

“Do you have a group?” the doctor said turning to me.

“We do!” I answered brightly.

“Good. I just need to be sure they are being socialized.”

Being socialized? You need to be sure?

I felt my fists forming into little bony balls of rage.
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How to homeschool without actually homeschooling

how to homeschool without actually homeschooling
Jamie Martin, editor of Simple Homeschool, also blogs about motherhood at Steady Mom

At the start of the new year many of you completed a survey for those of us who blog under the Simple Living Media umbrella. I admit to being rather surprised when I found out that a significant percentage of those who read this blog regularly are not actually homeschoolers.

Let me say it once and for all: Homeschooling or not, you are welcome here!

At its core, homeschooling is a lifestyle of intentionality when it comes to our kids’ educations. Being intentional doesn’t mean sending our kids to the school around the corner just because it’s around the corner. Being intentional also doesn’t mean homeschooling just because all your friends homeschool.

Intentionality means taking the time and effort necessary to give thought to what is best–for your children, yourself, and your family.

Maybe you went through that intentional process. Maybe the concept of homeschooling even intrigued you, but you ultimately decided it isn’t for your family at the present moment. Yet you’re always looking for ways to cultivate an atmosphere and a love of learning at home.

Did you know a new word has been invented to describe what you’re doing?

It’s called afterschooling. Here’s how to do it well.
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Waste your time

Waste Your Time

The following is a guest post by Sarah Mackenzie of Amongst Lovely Things.

I have something of an obsession with being productive and efficient. It’s a good trait when it comes to tackling my to-do list, but it’s a big problem when it comes to homeschooling my kids.

See, homeschooling is all about relationships, and relationships just aren’t efficient.

By definition, to be efficient is to achieve maximum productivity with minimum wasted effort or expense. But relationships don’t flourish or grow that way. Relationships need time, spent lavishly.

This can be a real struggle for those of us who homeschool. We have so much to get to: the laundry, meal planning and preparation, housework, errands, running children hither and yon, making time and space for other daily efforts like exercise, our spouses, and our personal development.

We want to be good stewards of our time, but maybe that time is best spent carelessly when it comes to people.

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On setting (& adjusting) your summer expectations

On setting and adjusting your summer expectations
Jamie Martin, editor of Simple Homeschool, also blogs about motherhood at Steady Mom

I‘m finishing this post off in a Midwestern hotel, right before the start of a journey we’ve planned all year (and that I’ve looked forward to for decades!)

We are preparing to kick off our Little House site tour–it’s like the ultimate field trip, visiting some of the sites that Laura called home.

All year long the kids and I have been studying the Little House books, in anticipation of actually seeing and experiencing some of what the Ingalls did long ago. I cannot wait!
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The best lesson about learning

heather3picmo

The following is a guest post written by Heather Caliri of A Little Yes.

To be honest, I’m still not sure why I freaked out about the clay.

My daughter had found the battery-powered pottery wheel at the thrift store. Her face flushed with excitement, she placed the box on the counter and paid for it with her allowance.

I was tentative at best. The thing looked like a toy instead of a tool. Plus I remembered from school how hard throwing clay was. Would she get as frustrated as I once had with centering it?

She asked for my help getting set up. I held the instructions in one hand and the air-dry clay in the other. I read aloud about wedging the clay, centering it on the wheel, about slip and water and — that’s when I noticed my heart racing.

I knew I shouldn’t be this upset by a toy pottery wheel, but I was. And I didn’t know how to calm the heck down.

I was babbling that maybe we should slow down for a minute — practice — wait — when she took the clay out of my hand, set it on the wheel, and pressed the pedal. Whirrrrr. The wheel spun around like a child’s record player.

I looked at my daughter. She glowed.

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