What do you do every day?

laura3picmo

Written by Laura Grace Weldon.

How do you answer this homeschooling question?

What do you do every day?

That’s what people wonder about homeschoolers. Sometimes they ask us point blank, “Okay you homeschool, but what do you DO every day?”

It seems like a huge mystery to non-homeschoolers that we self-compose our days, somehow proceeding without the structure school imposes. Yet that question isn’t irrelevant. We’ve chosen to learn in ways that are entirely out of the mainstream. That confuses some, upsets others, and simply provokes curiosity in many. They’re waiting to hear what we have to say. No pressure there!

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Stress to the test

testpicmo

Written by Lora Lynn Fanning of Vitafamiliae

Before we left for this year’s homeschool convention, I thought it would be the “smart” thing to test my fourth-graders to make sure I wasn’t missing some major piece in their learning puzzle. If I was, I could research it at the convention.

I paid for an online test and followed all the rules. The results weren’t exactly surprising, but they weren’t encouraging, either. I had two fourth-graders who were burned out on math and we were struggling to motivate them to care about their work.

My husband and I arrived at convention with crazy eyes and worried brows.
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A summer reading list — for moms.

summer reading list for moms shWritten by contributor Anne Bogel of Modern Mrs. Darcy

For weary homeschooling parents, summer is a great time to rest, re-group, and remember why you chose to homeschool in the first place. I don’t know about you, but nothing kindles my enthusiasm for a subject more effectively than a good book.

Come July, my enthusiasm for homeschooling needs some kindling.

That’s why, every summer, I like to stock my bookshelves (and my beach bag) with books that remind we why we chose this homeschooling path, inspire me to do better, and encourage me for the upcoming school year.

I’ve found these 5 books extremely helpful at times when I needed to be reminded why we do what we do:
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Making friends through homeschooling (without worrying about socialization)


The following is a guest post by Kara Anderson of Quill and Camera.

We were at a follow-up check for my daughter, who had surprised our ancient cat–and paid for it.

Her hand had become infected from a deep scratch, and for some reason, I was convinced this was a sign of terrible parenting. And so, I was already on edge when the doctor asked my 5-year-old how she liked school.

“Ummm, I homeschool,” she said looking to me for reassurance.

She is still not accustomed to people asking this. But I have an older son, and so I am used to it. I also know the inevitable follow-up.

“Do you have a group?” the doctor said turning to me.

“We do!” I answered brightly.

“Good. I just need to be sure they are being socialized.”

Being socialized? You need to be sure?

I felt my fists forming into little bony balls of rage.
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How to homeschool without actually homeschooling

how to homeschool without actually homeschooling
Jamie Martin, editor of Simple Homeschool, also blogs about motherhood at Steady Mom

At the start of the new year many of you completed a survey for those of us who blog under the Simple Living Media umbrella. I admit to being rather surprised when I found out that a significant percentage of those who read this blog regularly are not actually homeschoolers.

Let me say it once and for all: Homeschooling or not, you are welcome here!

At its core, homeschooling is a lifestyle of intentionality when it comes to our kids’ educations. Being intentional doesn’t mean sending our kids to the school around the corner just because it’s around the corner. Being intentional also doesn’t mean homeschooling just because all your friends homeschool.

Intentionality means taking the time and effort necessary to give thought to what is best–for your children, yourself, and your family.

Maybe you went through that intentional process. Maybe the concept of homeschooling even intrigued you, but you ultimately decided it isn’t for your family at the present moment. Yet you’re always looking for ways to cultivate an atmosphere and a love of learning at home.

Did you know a new word has been invented to describe what you’re doing?

It’s called afterschooling. Here’s how to do it well.
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